Myself Essay For 6th Class Math

Essay on Myself

Below we have provided some simple paragraph and easy essay on Myself for the school students. They are generally given this topic to write paragraphs or essays in their schools during exams or class tests. You can select any myself essay given below according to your need and requirement.

Myself Essay 1 (100 words)

Myself Rajani Tyagi, live in Ghaziabad in the New Panchwati colony. I read in the class 5th in the section B. I read in the school New Era Ghaziabad. I am very punctual and like to do my all works throughout the day at right time. I love to eat simple and healthy food. I like dancing, reading books, playing badminton and cooking in my spare time. I never bunk my classes and attend every class. I go to school daily in proper uniform. I do well in the exams whether main or class tests. I have many friends however Sarita is my best friend.

Myself Essay 2 (150 words)

There are many people living in world having different personalities. This is the personality which makes everyone unique and different from others. We can never see two people of exactly same personality. It never changes and decided the quality of a person. I am taking the example of me. I am so special in this world and have unique personality than others. I am very responsible and sympathetic person. I always help others and try my best to solve their problems. I am self-centred woman have not have any enemy in this world.

I always talk to others very happily with smiling face. I am a very simple student in my school and attend each class. I do my homework very well on daily basis and study well every day in the night till 10 pm and in the morning from 4 am. I always pay attention to my study and motivate my friends as well to focus on their study.

Myself Essay 3 (200 words)

My name is Archana Mishra but generally called by everyone as Gudia. I am 12 years old, read in class 7th standard. I am a second child of my parents and have an elder brother. I have a joint family in which my uncle, grandparents and cousins in the same big house. We love each other very much and closely related to grandparents. I have a group of friends however Sina is my best and true friend. I can share anything to her and she too. We read in the same school but in different sections. I like very much to tell jokes to my friends while being in the bus after school time.

I have a unique family. All the members of my family are broad and open minded. They always promote me to do well in every field. They never pull me back instead motivate. I am very happy to get birth in this family. My family is cross-cultural extended family where my uncles, aunts, grandparents, cousins, etc live together. I have great time with my family because we celebrate each festival together. I help other kids in family in doing their home works daily.


Myself Essay 4 (250 words)

My name is Queen but have a nick name called as Sara. My parents and grandparents generally call me by my nick name. My parents are very conscious to my health. They wake me up daily in the morning at 5 am and tell me to do all the daily routines. My mom gives me an apple a day in the daily morning and a healthy breakfast after one hour. I go to school at right time through school bus. I never get late. My school starts at 8 am in the morning and ends at 2 pm in the afternoon. My mom gives me healthy fruits for fruit break and healthy lunch for lunch break.

I read in 8th standard in the school, Ch. Chhabil Dass Junior Public School. I am 13 years old and live in Ghaziabad with my parents. I also have joined dance and piano classes out of the school as I like to learn dance and piano very much. I enjoy my school time thoroughly with my friends and home time with my dearest parents and grandparents. I have good neighbours; they understand each other and never quarrel. I love picnic and go to tour in my winter and summer vacations. I am very good student in my school. I participate in all the extracurricular activities of the schools and do well. I am very good in academic and sports activities. My school has a big garden and big playground provides all the facilities of sports. My school has healthy, nice and peaceful environment.

Myself Essay 5 (300 words)

My name is Sulekha; I read in class 9th standard in Delhi. I am a self-driven and self motivated student. I like to motivate my friends of the school always and help them in their difficult times. I am a bright student of my school and do well in the academic and sports activities. I am capable to do well under any stressful condition. I am very skilled and knowledgeable student in my school. I do very hard study for long hours around the clock at home. I never left my home works and class works incomplete and like to complete all before bed time. My teachers like me very much because of my goodness and punctuality. I never become tired and continuously do hard work because my parents take care of me always. They always become conscious for my health and diet.

Because of my academic tenure, I always get good marks and grades. I am a merit scholarship holder in my school. I learn computer very well in my school and know everything about computer. I do everything according to my organized schedule of work. I never avoid my any of the works whether at home or at school. I always respect my parents and help my mom in her house works and my father in his office projects. I share my mom’s laundries and washing dishes works. I always keep my room clean and decorate attractively every Sunday. I understand my all responsibilities toward myself and my family very well. I always try to make my friends and classmates happy through my interesting jokes and nice talks. I always become ready to give them advises and suggestions to get them out of their difficulties. I am very sympathetic girl and try to support old people and children in my colony or on the way.


Myself Essay 6 (400 words)

I am a lovely boy of my dear parents. I am 14 years old boy and read in class 4th standard in the section A. My name is Suresh Raina. I study in Ryan Public School in Ghaziabad. My grandfather likes to say me Guddu. He always takes me out with him in the morning and evening for the walk. I live with my family in the Rajnagar colony in Ghaziabad. I go to school with my school bus daily at right time in the morning at 7 am and come to home at 2 pm in the afternoon. I like to go school in proper uniform after become fresh. I say good morning to my class teacher when I reach to my classroom. I enjoy daily with my school friends in the bus and lunch time. I always take part in the sports activities and other extracurricular activities.

My school organizes inter-school competitions at every six months which I must participate. I always come first in every competition. My school celebrates all the important events of the year such as independence Day, Republic Day, Christmas, 2nd October, Mother’s day, Teacher’s day, etc in order to increase our awareness and knowledge about. We are advised by our class teacher to must participate in the cultural activities while celebrating any event. I generally take part in the poem recitation or speech recitation. I also like dance but not feel so comfortable to dance at event celebration. However, I take part in the dance in my annual function which gets celebrated in the month of November every year. My parents are also invited to the school annual function.

My parents get me out at picnic or long tour in my every vacation during winter or summer season. I live in very good society where some programmes are organized from time to time in order to increase awareness among common public about the social issues. My father always takes me with him to participate in such programmes. My mom always teaches me about ethics and etiquettes to make me a good citizen of India. I always keep my study room and bed room neat and clean. I always take care of my hygiene and wash hands well with soap before and after eating the food. My mom and dad love me a lot and care for my every likes and dislikes. I like to play ludo or carom with my parents whenever they become free.

As a math teacher, it’s easy to get frustrated with struggling students. They miss class. They procrastinate. When you take away their calculators, they moan like children who’ve lost their teddy bears. (Admittedly, a trauma.)

Even worse is what they don’t do. Ask questions. Take notes. Correct failing quizzes, even when promised that corrections will raise their scores. Don’t they care that they’re failing? Are they trying not to pass?

There are plenty of ways to diagnose such behavior. Chalk it up to sloth, disinterest, out-of-school distractions – surely those all play a role. But if you ask me, there’s a more powerful and underlying cause.

Math makes people feel stupid. It hurts to feel stupid.

It’s hard to realize this unless you’ve experienced it firsthand. Luckily, I have (although it didn’t feel so lucky at the time). So here is my tale of mathematical failure. See if it sounds familiar.

***

Thanks to a childhood of absurd privilege, I entered college well-prepared. As a sophomore in the weed-out class for Yale math majors, I earned the high score on the final exam. After that, it seemed plausible to me that I’d never fail at anything mathematical.

But senior spring, I ran into Topology. A little like a bicycle running into a tree.

Topology had a seminar format, which meant that the students taught the class to each other. Twice during the semester, each of us would prepare a lecture, then assign and grade a homework assignment. By reputation, a pretty easy gig.

My failure began as most do: gradually, quietly. I took dutiful notes from my classmates’ lectures, but felt only a hazy half-comprehension. While I could parrot back key phrases, I felt a sense of vagueness, a slight disconnect – I knew I was missing things, but didn’t know quite what, and I clung to the idle hope that one good jolt might shake all the pieces into place.

But I didn’t seek out that jolt. In fact, I never asked for help. (Too scared of looking stupid.) Instead, I just let it all slide by, watching without grasping, feeling those flickers of understanding begin to ebb, until I no longer wondered whether I was lost. Now I knew I was lost.

So I did what most students do. I leaned on a friend who understood things better than I did. I bullied my poor girlfriend (also in the class) into explaining the homework problems to me. I never replicated her work outright, but I didn’t really learn it myself, either. I merely absorbed her explanations enough to write them up in my own words, a misty sort of comprehension that soon evaporated in the sun. (It was the Yale equivalent of my high school students’ worst vice, copying homework. If you’re reading this, guys: Don’t do it!)

I blamed others for my ordeal. Why had my girlfriend tricked me into taking this nightmare class? (She hadn’t.) Why did the professor just lurk in the back of the classroom, cackling at our incompetence, instead of teaching us? (He wasn’t cackling. Lurking, maybe, but not cackling.) Why did it need to be stupid topology, instead of something fun? (Topology is beautiful, the mathematics of lava lamps and pottery wheels.) And, when other excuses failed, that final line of defense: I hate this class! I hate topology!

Sing it with me: “I hate math!”

My first turn as lecturer went fine, even though my understanding was paper-thin. But as we delved deeper into the material, I could see my second lecture approaching like a distant freight train. I felt like I was tied to the tracks. (Exactly how Algebra 1 students feel when asked to answer those word problems about trains.)

As I procrastinated, spending more time at dinner complaining about topology than in the library doing topology, I realized that procrastination isn’t just about laziness. It’s about anxiety. To work on something you don’t understand means facing your doubts and confusions head-on. Procrastination pushes back that painful confrontation.

As the day approached, I began to panic. I called my dad, a warm and gentle soul. It didn’t help. I called my sister, a math educator who always lifts my spirits. It didn’t help. Backed into a corner, I scheduled a meeting with the professor to throw myself at his mercy.

I was sweating in the elevator up to his office. The worst thing was that I admired him. Most world-class mathematicians view teaching undergraduates as a burdensome act of charity, like ladling soup for unbathed children. He was different: perceptive, hardworking, sincere. And here I was, knocking on his office door, striding in to tell him that I had come up short. An unbathed child asking for soup.

Teachers have such power. He could have crushed me if he wanted.

He didn’t, of course. Once he recognized my infantile state, he spoon-fed me just enough ideas so that I could survive the lecture. I begged him not to ask me any tough questions during the presentation – in effect, asking him not to do his job – and with a sigh he agreed.

I made it through the lecture, graduated the next month, and buried the memory as quickly as I could.

***

Looking back, it’s amazing what a perfect specimen I was. I manifested every symptom that I now see in my own students:

  • Muddled half-comprehension.
  • Fear of asking questions.
  • Shyness about getting the teacher’s help.
  • Badgering a friend instead.
  • Copying homework.
  • Excuses; blaming others.
  • Procrastination.
  • Anxiety about public failure.
  • Terror of the teacher’s judgment.
  • Feeling incurably stupid.
  • Not wanting to admit any of it.

It’s surprisingly hard to write about this, even now. Mathematical failure – much like romantic failure – leaves us raw and vulnerable. It demands excuses.

I tell my story to illustrate that failure isn’t about a lack of “natural intelligence,” whatever that is. Instead, failure is born from a messy combination of bad circumstances: high anxiety, low motivation, gaps in background knowledge. Most of all, we fail because, when the moment comes to confront our shortcomings and open ourselves up to teachers and peers, we panic and deploy our defenses instead. For the same reason that I pushed away Topology, struggling students push me away now.

Not understanding Topology doesn’t make me stupid. It makes me bad at Topology. That’s a difference worth remembering, whether you’re a math prodigy, a struggling student, or a teacher holding your students’ sense of self-worth in the palm of your hand. Failing at math ought to be like any failure, frustrating but ultimately instructive. In the end, I’m grateful for the experience. Just as therapists must undergo therapy as part of their training, no math teacher ought to set foot near human students until they’ve felt the sting of mathematical failure.

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This entry was posted in Reflections and tagged humble pie, math phobia, math teaching by Ben Orlin. Bookmark the permalink.
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